gas-ready

Gas Ready, You Say? DNV GL Defines It

December 3, 2014 in LNG, Marine by Rich Piellisch  |  No Comments

New Notation ‘Provides a Clean Picture,’ Classification Society Says

Noting that the long-awaited IGF Code for liquefied natural gas is “practically finalized,” and that “LNG as a ship fuel is spreading rapidly through the maritime world,” DNV GL has released a Gas Ready notation to guide shipbuilders who want to be ready for LNG, but aren’t yet prepared to commit to it.
Read More >>

Gas-Ready, You Say? Lloyd’s Defines It

December 1, 2014 in LNG, Marine by Rich Piellisch  |  No Comments

Lloyd’s Register Sets ‘Clean Standards’ on LNG Preparedness

Lloyd’s Register has issued a “standard for clarity” on the various levels of liquefied natural gas preparedness, addressing the increasingly common practice of building new ships with provision for LNG fuel tanks and other equipment for a when a shift to LNG operation is warranted – “LNG-ready.” updated December 3

UASC claims the world’s largest LNG-ready container ship. The 15,000-TEU Sajir is to be delivered by Hyundai Heavy Industries and Hyundai Samho Heavy Industries by mid-2016. It’s to connect Asia and Northern Europe.

UASC claims the world’s largest LNG-ready container ship. The 15,000-TEU Sajir is to be delivered by Hyundai Heavy Industries and Hyundai Samho Heavy Industries by mid-2016. It’s to connect Asia and Northern Europe.

“While LNG as fuel has been adopted in projects that make commercial sense already, like Northern Europe ferry routes,” Lloyd’s says, “most deep sea players who are interested in the potential of gas fuelled operations are not yet ready to commit to LNG fuel but want to have the option to adopt gas as a fuel in the future built into newbuilding projects.”

The classification society notes too that “those looking at a gas-fueled future will have varying appetites for levels of investment and preparedness based on clarity over their options at the newbuilding stage, and then through operational life.”

Different Levels of Gas Readiness

In response, Lloyd’s “has established clear standards describing different levels of readiness to use gas as a marine fuel.”

“We have developed this notation, with clearly identifiable levels, to enable technical and contractual decisions as to what different levels of gas readiness mean,” says Lloyd’s LNG specialist Luis Benito.

“This means that shipyards can be clear about what they are offering and buyers know what they are getting – and at what price,” he says in the organization’s standards announcement.

‘A Vital Tool’

LR’s new GR notation, for Gas-Fueled Readiness, helps justify design and production – and capital expenditure – requirements, as well as investment and operational planning. The GR notation employs the following subnotes:

  • A: indicates that Approval in principle has been achieved for the basic design;
  • S: necessary Structural reinforcement and materials have been installed;
  • T: the gas storage Tank is in place;
  • P: the gas fuel Piping arrangements are installed; and
  • E: subset Engineering systems, such as Main engines, Auxiliary engines, Boilers and Incinerators, are also gas-fueled.

As an example, Lloyd’s the descriptive note GR(A, S, E(M,I)) indicates that the full design of the gas fuel system has been appraised and approved in principle; that the vessel structure is reinforced to support the proposed gas storage tank but the gas fuel tank and associated arrangements are not yet installed; and that the main engine and incinerator are approved, certified and installed ready for gas fuel operation.

The new GR notation, Lloyd’s says, “gives real meaning to options for ‘gas readiness.’”

“This is a vital tool for agreement at a contract stage for levels of readiness that also allows contracts to be flexible if the owner wants to make changes at agreed opportunities even during construction,” Benito says.

Soon after the Lloyd’s Register Gas Ready announcement, DNV GL issued a release on its Gas Ready notation (HHPi, December 3).

Contact information is only available to premium subscribers. Click here to purchase a premium subscription.

Source: Lloyd’s Register with HHP Insight follow-up



  • Archives