Lloyd’s & Koreans LNG Bunkering Pact

September 19, 2016 in Companies, LNG, Marine, Studies by Rich Piellisch  |  No Comments

Collaboration to Study Ship-to-Ship LNG Bunkering
Given Current Absence of Standards and Guidelines,
Goal Is ‘to Help All Stakeholders with Interest in LNG’

Lloyd’s Register says it’s collaborating with Hyundai Heavy Industries and Hyundai Mipo Dockyard on a compatibility study of ship-to-ship bunkering of liquefied natural gas container ships. The study “will comprehensively review the design requirements between 6.6K LNG bunkering ships and 14K TEU LNG-fueled container ships with the goal of verifying safe ship-to-ship LNG bunkering…

This item was initially posted on September 9

Currently, says Lloyd’s Register, there are ‘no existing standards or guidelines that cover the design and procedure for safe ship-to-ship LNG bunkering.’

Currently, says Lloyd’s Register, there are ‘no existing standards or guidelines that cover the design and procedure for safe ship-to-ship LNG bunkering.’

“The study aims to help all stakeholders with interest in LNG as fuel,” Lloyd’s says, “to envisage a clear picture of possible options for LNG supply infrastructure.”

The work follows up previous initiatives on LNG ships with the Hyundai units, including an AiP/approval in principle issued earlier this year for a Hyundai Mipo bunker vessel design (HHP Insight, June 6).

Ship-to-Ship: Cost-Effective

Currently, says the UK classification society, there are “no existing standards or guidelines that cover the design and procedure for safe ship-to-ship LNG bunkering.

“However, this method of bunkering is preferable for many port authorities for safe and effective port operation and also preferable for ship operators due to cost-effective convenience.”

The partners “will evaluate the right direction for LNG supply infrastructure,” too.

Lloyd’s notes that it’s already developed a checklist for the design of LNG bunkering vessels and LNG receiving vessels, summarizing the risks related to ship-to-ship LNG bunkering. The checklist “suggests design aspects which are not covered by legislation but are useful in understanding the characteristics of LNG-fueled/LNG bunkering ships at the design stage,” Lloyd’s says.

Korea’s Hyundai Mipo Dockyard has already designed several LNG bunker vessels.

Korea’s Hyundai Mipo Dockyard has already designed several LNG bunker vessels.

“We are expecting to comprehensively review our design in order to identify the key points for further improvements suited for the clients’ interests and demands,” Hyundai Mipo initial planning division executive VP Chang-hyun Yoon says in the collaboration announcement – “thus trying to mitigate or minimize any potential issues which the operators can encounter during real operational situations.”

‘Uncertainty’

“The uncertainty associated with LNG supply infrastructure is still an influential factor in determining the profitability of a LNG-fueled vessel,” Jin-Tae Lee, Lloyd’s chief representative and marine manager in Korea, says in hos company’s release.

“Stakeholders need to have a clear understanding of the benefits and challenges,” he said. “Our Busan Technical Support Office, led by Vincent Rees, is fully prepared to assist our clients in LNG-related projects from the concept design phase to the verification phase, which will be tailored to meet the individual clients’ needs.”

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Lloyd’s Register (UK), Luis Benito, +44-7580-906275; luis.benito@lr.org

Lloyd’s Register (Busan, Korea), Vincent Rees, +82-51-640-5045; vincent.rees@lr.org

Lloyd’s Register info, David Barrow, +44-330-414-0056; mobile +44-7789-1983; david.barrow@lr.org

Lloyd’s Register info, Paul Carrett, +44-330-414-0087; paul.carrett@lr.org; www.lr.org

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Source: Lloyd’s Register with HHP Insight follow-up

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